NASA released its first incredible video of our closest look at Saturn yet

On April 26, the Cassini spacecraft flew closer to Saturn than ever before — between the gap that separates the planet from its rings.

Since then, Cassini has been transmitting dozens of images of Saturn’s surface. Here, NASA has compiled all the images into one, incredible video that reveals exactly what Cassini saw.

One of the sights that surprised scientists most was the sharp edges of Saturn’s hexagon and its central vortex. Saturn’s hexagon is a giant cloud system on Saturn’s north pole, and it contains a central vortex.

The sharp edges scientists saw in these latest images suggests that the cloud system and its vortex are not mixing with their surroundings. But what’s preventing the clouds in the hexagon from mixing with the clouds right next to it is a mystery.

This first dive marked the beginning of the end for Cassini. For the last 13 years, Cassini has explored Saturn and its moons. But its time will come to an end this September, when it will enter Saturn’s atmosphere and burn up.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai

FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/techinsider
INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/businessins…
TUMBLR: http://businessinsider.tumblr.com/

 

Untangling the Cosmos Symposium – CIFAR and Ontario Science Centre

Colleagues, This may interest you.
Join CIFAR and the Ontario Science Centre on May 17, 2017 for a symposium that will take you on a journey to unravel some of the greatest secrets of the universe. Moderated by Jay Ingram, the symposium will feature leading Canadian and international researchers in astronomy and cosmology. Through plenary talks and panel discussions with the audience, they will discuss major recent breakthroughs in our understanding of the properties of and forces in the universe, and explore areas where research is pushing the boundaries to answer some of astronomy’s deepest questions.

This event is open to the public. For educators, please note that this event aligns with Grade 9 and 12 science curricula. It will feature how researchers are generating new knowledge about fundamental concepts in astronomy, including the origins of the universe and evolution of stars, how they are uncovering new areas of scientific investigation, and the new techniques and technologies that are providing a more thorough understanding of the universe.

This event is an affiliate event of Innovation 150, celebrating ideas, ingenuity and innovation for Canada’s 150th year.

LEARN MORE & REGISTER – click here!

Canadian Institute for Advanced Research
CIFAR.CA

A full moon, an eclipse and a comet — all in one night

By Nicole Mortillaro, CBC News Posted: Feb 10, 2017 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Feb 10, 2017 9:20 AM ET

This weekend offers a good reminder that there’s a lot going on in space

Friday is a night full of fun astronomical treats.

First, there’s February’s full moon, called the Snow Moon — named for the typically cold and snowy weather this time of year.

All full moons are given nicknames, such as January’s Wolf Moon, the Strawberry Moon in May, and, of course, the Harvest Moon — the one nearest the autumnal equinox in either September or October.

The Snow Moon will rise around 5:35 p.m in Toronto and at 5:26 p.m. in Vancouver.

Read more…