Slime Art | Science Experiments | Steve Spangler Science

How to make Art from Slime

We all know that playing with slime is one of the best things in the world.  But, what do you do when you’re done.  You can put it into a zip-lock bag and save it for later, or you can make Slime Art.  What exactly is Slime Art?  Well, once you leave slime out to dry it will turn into an amazing piece or sculpture.

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Edible Slime | Science Experiments | Steve Spangler Science

Want to gobble some ooey-gooey slime? Get your grub on with this gak recipe that you can eat!

Slime is a staple of Halloween, chemistry, and science, in general. What could be better than stretching a glob of goo between your hands or letting it run between your fingers? Well, if you’re like us, you want to be able to eat it. With this Edible Slime recipe, that’s exactly what you can do. What are you waiting for? Mix up a batch of your own.

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Borax Slime Activity Concerns Update

Borax Advisory Update Health Canada

Health Canada issued an advisory this past summer, suggesting that exposure to boron substances be reduced as much as possible from all sources. They identified boron substances as a developmental and reproductive health risk. They also stated that parents should not make slime and putties with borax and boric acid. By extension, teachers began to question the safety of making slime in their science classes. In response to questions posed by the STAO Safety Committee, Health Canada has clarified their advisory issued this past summer.

Regarding the use of Borax/Boric Acid, Health Canada wrote:

The proper use of gloves and goggles will reduce exposures to chemical substances. The main concern with the use of boron containing substances for making slimes or putties, is with accidental or intentional ingestion. This ingestion hazard is mainly targeted at young children who are prone to hand-to-mouth activities.

High school students, who have received proper training in hazardous material handling, and who are properly supervised to prevent ingestion, would be at low risk of exposure to boron, or other hazardous materials used as part of a science curriculum. The safe disposal of any boron containing substances should be closely monitored to prevent accidental or intentional ingestion.

Students younger than high school age, and those who have not been properly advised in the safe handling of laboratory chemicals should not be using borax, or any other hazardous chemicals at home or in a school setting.

Suggestions for activities involving borax or boric acid:

Although the chemicals containing boron do not readily cross the skin barrier, steps could be taken to prevent skin contact. Students could be issued gloves or alternatively, the ingredients for slime could be placed in a sealed plastic bag and then mixed. Students should be instructed to wash their hands at the end of the lab activity. Teachers should then collect the slime prior to dismissal to ensure that accidental or intentional ingestion does not occur. The slime can then be thrown out with the regular garbage.

Some suggested safer alternatives, for making slime or putties involving glue, have a high volatile organic compound (VOC) content and release this into the air. However, other glue and borax free recipes are available on-line and teachers are encouraged to explore the use of these safer alternatives.

We hope that the information in this response will help you in making an informed decision as to the use of boron containing substances in teaching science. Our safety committee can be contacted with your safety questions at info@stao.org, attention STAO Safety Committee.
Dave Gervais
Chair STAO Safety Committee

 

Borax Safety Concern Raised by Health Canada

Earlier this summer Health Canada issued an advisory warning about the potential health hazards of using Borax (see link below).

This advisory is of particular concern to science teachers since making homemade “slime” is a common activity that may involve the use of borax.

Information Update – Health Canada advises Canadians to avoid homemade craft and pesticide recipes using boric acid

One approach to dealing with this issue is to look for slime recipes that involve safer alternatives.  Check out this link for one possibility