6 YouTube channels that make learning about science fun

This post is part of Mashable’s ongoing series The Women Fixing STEM, which highlights trailblazing women in science, tech, engineering, and math, as well as initiatives and organizations working to close the industries’ gender gaps.

Learning shouldn’t stop after school ends, and the women of YouTube’s STEM channels prove that.

These aren’t the boring science lessons that you had to sit through in stuffy high school classrooms or massive college lecture halls. There are no tests, no grades, and no assignments. You will, however, need a sense of curiosity and a love for all things science.

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Why you should love gross science – TED Talk

 

What can we learn from the slimy, smelly side of life? In this playful talk, science journalist Anna Rothschild shows us the hidden wisdom of “gross stuff” and explains why avoiding the creepy underbelly of nature, medicine and technology closes us off to important sources of knowledge about our health and the world. “When we explore the gross side of life, we find insights that we never would have thought we’d find, and we even often reveal beauty that we didn’t think was there,” Rothschild says. Continue reading

Greening the School Science Lab

Introduction 

For over 40 years, Flinn Scientific has embraced a consistent philosophy regarding the use of chemicals in science labs: “Chemicals in any form can be safely stored, handled or used if the physical, chemical, and hazardous properties are fully understood and the necessary precautions, including the use of proper safeguards and personal protective equipment, are observed.” We still believe this philosophy is appropriate.

With negative attention focused on “problem” chemicals, the idea of “green chemistry” may seem like an oxymoron. Green chemistry, however, is real, and it carries a positive message about chemistry and science. Green Chemistry calls for the design of chemical products and processes that will reduce or eliminate the generation of hazardous substances. How can instructors and schools benefit from the principles of green chemistry and the knowledge gained through its success?

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The Top Science Stories of 2016 – Home | Quirks & Quarks with Bob McDonald | CBC Radio

The silhouette of a scientist against a visualisation of gravitational waves pictured during a press conference by the Max Planck Institute for GravitationalPhysics (Albert Einstein Institute) at the Leibniz University in Hanover, Germany, 11 February 2016. (Julian Stratenschulte/EPA) Continue reading