Live Animals in the Classroom Safety Notes – submitted by Flinn Scientific Canada

Studying living organisms in biology and life science is a “natural” way to engage students and
nurture their interest in biology. Keeping live animals requires thoughtful consideration of learning
goals, school policies, and potential dangers.

Click here to go to the source of ‘Live Animals in the Classroom’. 

Website:  https://www.flinnsci.ca/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/flinnscientificcanada

 

 

STAO Safety Mindedness Teacher Training Resource -Updated with Closed Captioning!!!

Closed Captioning Update

The STAO Safety Mindedness (SSM) program is an interactive online training program to train teachers on common safety-related issues in a typical Science (Grades 9–12) and Science and Technology (Grades K–8) programs. SSM is an easy to use, flexible and cost-effective strategy to meet your school’s safety training needs. The training provided by this program helps promote a culture of safety mindedness in your school. SSM has just been updated to include closed captioning.

Content 

Both the elementary and secondary versions of SSM are divided into 8 convenient modules.  The content of each module is consistent with STAO’s safety reference texts, ‘Safety in Elementary Science and Technology’ and ‘Safe On Science, Second Edition’.

Click here for content details 

Access

SSM is available, free of charge, to all teachers and can be accessed from the STAO website, blog, or via the following links.  School boards are encouraged to run SSM off their internal servers at no cost.  Contact info@stao.org for details.

School Board Customization Services Available.

SSM can be customized to include board-specific content, e.g., logos, inserts (customization charges will apply). Contact info@stao.org for details.

 

A Safer Alternative to the Rainbow Demonstration

While serious accidents causing catastrophic injury in high school science activities are rare, when they occur their human toll can be devastating.  This post examines one potentially dangerous demo, its hazards and suggestions for safer alternatives.

The Rainbow Flame Demonstration:

Several of the most serious science accidents have resulted from the combustion of flammable liquids in teacher demonstrations like the rainbow flame demonstration.  In this demo, metals salts are heated in a ceramic dish containing burning methanol.  The flame colour observed is characteristic of the metal.  Click on this link for an example of how this demo is sometimes done. Please note that the procedure used in this video, in our opinion, is unsafe, inappropriate for students of any age and NOT recommended for teachers.

The Hazard:

Methanol vapours are extremely flammable. Furthermore, since the density of methanol is greater than that or air, methanol vapour can flow invisibly across surfaces like the demonstration desk and onto the floor towards unsuspecting observers. A flame, spark or even a hot surface can supply sufficient energy to ignite the vapour and create a sudden flash fire. The situation can be even more catastrophic if a nearby open container of methanol is present.

The Safer (and Better) Way: 

Click here to download the complete article

Don’t Be Shocked—Electrical Safety – Flinn Scientific Canada

Accidents involving electricity can cause shock, burns, and even death. Reviewing and following a few basic rules will help you improve electrical safety when working with hot plates, electrophoresis equipment, power supplies, Van de Graaff generators, etc. Continue reading

Christmas Tree Safety – Cool Science Demonstration

 

There’s nothing like the fresh smell of a real tree, but real trees can also pose a serious fire hazard if the tree accidentally dries out. Steve Spangler shares a “television-only” science demonstration with firefighters in a controlled situation that illustrates how dry trees are susceptible to catching fire and ways to avoid this potential fire risk. Continue reading