Balancing Hex Nut Challenge

Balancing Hex Nuts

This teeter-tottering tower of hex nuts can balance on the edge of a glass, but you’ll need help from magnets.

There are a number of things that can help your balance. You could try walking with books on your hand, walking a tightrope, or taking some ballet classes. If you’re a hex nut, however, you’re going to need some help from magnets and their magnetic fields. Do you think you have the magnetism it takes to master the Balancing Hex Nut Challenge?

Materials

  • 4 soda cans
  • 2 ceramic magnets
  • Ruler
  • 5 hex nuts
  • Tall drinking glass (empty)
  • Adult supervision

Click here to link to Steve Spangler’s Website for more details

 

How much does a falling magnet weigh?

Armed with a large neodymium magnet, an aluminium tube and a set of scales, Andy explores the interaction of forces generated as the magnet falls and the effect these forces have on the objects’ weight.

Explore more Tales from the Prep Room and let us know in the comments below which experiment you would like to see from us next: http://richannel.org/collections/2011…

Watch more science videos on the Ri Channel http://richannel.org

Magnetic Tomatoes

Mention the word magnetism and most of us think of one iron-based object attracting another.  This form of magnetism is called ferromagnetism.  Iron, nickel and cobalt are the most common elements that exhibit ferromagnetic properties.  However, two other less familiar forms of magnetism also exist.  These are called paramagnetism and diamagnetism.  This video shows an example of diamagnetic of an unlikely object – a tomato.

The following video provides a useful summary of how the three forms of magnetism differ.

How would you use this resource with your class?  Please share your ideas using the comment bubble.