Sources of Light Cooperative Learning Activity

Idea- lightbulb ImageBy Varsha Patel, TDSB

Introduction

I chose to cover luminous sources using this cooperative learning activity (CL) as a way to make the topic more interesting and meaningful to the students. Students can be easily grouped according to the light source for which they are responsible, another reason why this activity works well. It is truly remarkable that once all the instructions (see Instructions sheet) were given out, the students were engaged — working quietly and attentively as they knew they all had roles to perform. Giving a time limit for the various parts of the activity ensured students maintained their level of readiness/involvement.

Click here to download the complete activity, including worksheets

 

The Speed of Light is NOT About Light | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios

The speed of light is often cited as the fastest anything can travel in our universe. While this might be true, the speed of light is the EFFECT and not the CAUSE of this phenomenon. So what’s the cause? On this week’s episode of Space Time, Matt helps explain what the speed of light REALLY is and why it’s the cosmic speed limit of our universe!

“The Real Meaning of E=mc²”:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xo232…

“Are Space And Time An Illusion?”:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YycAz…

The World’s Most Unavoidable Carcinogen

Out in the open air on a beautiful summer day, most people don’t realize that they’re bathing in the world’s most common carcinogen – the sun’s rays. Ultra violet (UV) rays to be exact. Let’s take a look at how UV rays affect your body, and the sorts of built-in chemical defense systems you’re working with to stop any potential damage.

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How a Laser Works

Bill shows how the three key characteristics of laser light – single wavelength, narrow beam, and high intensity – are made. He explains the operation of a ruby laser – the first laser ever made – showing how electronic transitions create stimulated emission to give coherent light, and then how the ends of the ruby cavity create a narrow wavelength highly collimated beam. You can learn more about laser in the EngineerGuy team’s new book Eight Amazing Engineering Stories http://www.engineerguy.com/elements