Use of PTC Paper – submitted by Dave Gervais, Chair STAO Safety Committee

Introduction:

Since its discovery in 1932, PTC paper has been a popular activity for students studying genetics. It is used to determine the genotypes of individuals, and is bitter tasting. It has been tied to the evolutionary advantage allowing some primates to detect toxins in a potential food. Foods containing PTC like substances may be avoided by tasters (broccoli, water cress).

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Chinese scientist reports 3rd pregnancy in baby-gene editing experiment | CBC News

As American researchers say they tried to discourage He Jiankui from pursuing what he claims are the world’s first genetically edited babies, the Chinese scientist insists he is proud of his work and revealed that another volunteer is pregnant.

Source: Chinese scientist reports 3rd pregnancy in baby-gene editing experiment | CBC News

Loop Game Genetics Review Revised – submitted by Nehal Patel

This is an update to Nehal’s Nov 27, 2018 post.  The game board required for this resource is now included below.  Our apologies to Nehal and all who opened the Nov 27 post for this omission.

Introduction:

The game involves students being dealt a set of cards, each with a question and an answer to a different question. Beginning with the student who has ‘START’ written on their card, they read out their question, and the student with the corresponding correct answer is required to read out the answer. That student then reads their question for another student to answer. The game continues until all questions have been answered and the sequence arrives to the ‘END’ card in which the loop is complete.

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Why do our bodies age? – TED- Ed

 

 

Human bodies aren’t built for extreme aging: our capacity is set at about 90 years. But what does aging really mean, and how does it counteract the body’s efforts to stay alive? Monica Menesini details the nine physiological traits that play a central role in aging.

Lesson by Monica Menesini, animation by Cinematic.

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-our-…