Will You Still Eat Raw Fish After Watching This Video?

Have you ever noticed that warning about raw or undercooked seafood at the bottom of restaurant menus? Ever wondered why it’s there? Because fish carry a ton of parasites, and if they aren’t prepared correctly then those parasites can make it into your body. But it turns out, this fishy intersection with the wild world of parasites can teach us a lot about how these moochers help keep ecosystems healthy, and why we should protect them. Continue reading

SNC1D – FRAMING ECOLOGY: THE IMPACTS OF FOOD PRODUCTION ON ECOSYSTEMS

Students worked in assigned teams (heterogeneous groupings) to research and analyze the impacts of food production on ecosystems, to evaluate the sustainability of our food production and to suggest a direction for future food production both in terms of sustainability and having enough to feed the planet. Continue reading

How your digestive system works TED-Ed

Across the planet, humans eat on average between 1 and 2.7 kilograms of food a day, and every last scrap makes its way through the digestive system. Comprised of ten organs covering nine meters, this is one of the most complicated systems in the body. Emma Bryce explains how the different parts of the digestive system work to transform your food into the nutrients and energy that keep you alive. Continue reading

HOW CAN WE USE OPTICS TO MAXIMIZE FOOD PRODUCTION? Grade 10 Science Activity

Food availability is limited in some regions of the world for many reasons, such as access to natural resources (sunlight, space, water, soil). Due to urbanization, access to fresh fruit and vegetables in urban areas is becoming more limited. How do we feed our communities and ensure food sustainably in an urban landscape?

In this inquiry-based activity, students will design and build a model of a greenhouse using mirrors and/or lenses that can be used to grow food all year. They will use their knowledge of optics to make their greenhouse more efficient (i.e., optimal temperature for plant growth).

*This activity can be used as a Course Culminating Activity as it allows students to demonstrate their proficiency in the following areas:

    Cells and Tissues (plants and plant growth)
    Chemical Reactions (pH of soil and acid-base reactions)
    Light and Optics (reflection and refraction through mirrors and lenses)
    Climate Change (influence of CO2 and temperature upon growth of plants)

INQUIRY FOCUS:
How can we use optics to maximize food production?

Keywords:
Reflection, refraction, pH, CO2, temperature, mirrors, lenses, plant growth

Written by DIANA NAUMOVSKI

This activity is part of STAO’s Connex Inquiry Resource Series

Click here to go to the complete resource