Why do you need to get a flu shot every year? – TED-Ed

All year long, researchers at hospitals around the world collect samples from flu patients and send them to top virology experts with one goal: to design the vaccine for the next flu season. But why do we need a new one every year? Continue reading

Your Amazing Molecular Machines – Veritasium

Every day in an adult human roughly 50-70 billion of your cells die. They may be damaged, stressed, or just plain old – this is normal, in fact it’s called programmed cell death.

To make up for that loss, right now, inside your body, billions of cells are dividing, creating new cells.

And cell division, also called mitosis, requires an army of tiny molecular machines.DNA is a good place to start – the double helix molecule that we always talk about.

This is a scientifically accurate depiction of DNA. If you unwind the two strands you can see that each has a sugar phosphate backbone connected to the sequence of nucleic acid base pairs, known by the letters A,T,G, and C.

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Is DNA the future of data storage? – TED- Ed Leo Bear-McGuinness

In the event of a nuclear fallout, every piece of digital and written information could all be lost. Luckily, there is a way that all of human history could be recorded and safely stored beyond the civilization’s end. Continue reading

Teacher Demo: Marshmallow DNA Model

This demonstration will provide students with a visual representation of the structure of DNA.  Students will learn the different components that make a nucleotide, the correct base-pair connection between nitrogenous bases, and visually see the double helix structure of DNA.

What happens?

In this demonstration, students will visually see what a DNA molecule looks like.  They will be able to determine the different components that makes up a nucleotide (phosphate, deoxyribose sugar, and nitrogenous base), will learn the correct base-pairing of bases in DNA (adenine always bonds with thymine and cytosine always bonds with guanine), will learn how many hydrogen bonds occur between each base pair, and will learn that phosphodiester linkages are formed between phosphate groups and deoxyribose sugars.  Students will also be able to identify the major groove and the minor groove in the double helix once the molecule is twisted.

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