Live Animals in the Classroom Safety Notes – submitted by Flinn Scientific Canada

Studying living organisms in biology and life science is a “natural” way to engage students and
nurture their interest in biology. Keeping live animals requires thoughtful consideration of learning
goals, school policies, and potential dangers.

Click here to go to the source of ‘Live Animals in the Classroom’. 

Website:  https://www.flinnsci.ca/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/flinnscientificcanada

 

 

Too expensive to save? Why the best way to protect endangered species could mean letting some go

The provocative new approach aims to protect more animals by prioritizing those that offer the best return on investment, but it could mean saying goodbye to some well-known species

Source: Too expensive to save? Why the best way to protect endangered species could mean letting some go

Why don’t poisonous animals poison themselves? – TED Ed by Rebecca D. Tarvin

Thousands of animal species use toxic chemicals to defend themselves from predators. Snakes have blood clotting compounds in their fangs, the bombardier beetle has corrosive liquid in its abdomen and jellyfish have venomous, harpoon-like structures in their tentacles. But how do these animals survive their own poisons? Continue reading

ANIMALS AND CRITICAL THINKING IN GRADE 2

How can studying an animal help people build a proper habitat for it?

Learning goal:  To understand that animals have distinct characteristics.  Animals have needs that must be met in order to survive.  Animals adapt to their environment.

by Jeff Finn

This resource is part of the STAO Connex inquiry and innovative practices collection.

Click here to go see the entire resource including lesson plans. 

 

 

20 Million Animals Preserved In Alcohol – Earth Unplugged

The Spirit Collection in London’s Natural History Museum is home to over 20 million dead animal specimens, collected from around the world. They are preserved and kept for research and educational purposes. Lizzie Daly met up with Ollie Crimmen, Senior Curator of Fish to find out a little more. Continue reading