Do Plants Think?

It’s Okay To Be Smart is written and hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D.
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Ninja Fly Vs Swat In Slow Motion – Earth Unplugged

Ever tried to swat a fly? This slow motion video highlights the way in which a fly reacts when attacked!

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Shake Your Silk-Maker: The Dance of the Peacock Spider

With their ornately-colored bodies, rhythmic pulsations, and booty-shaking dance moves, male peacock spiders attract the attention of spectating females as well as researchers. One such animal behavior specialist, Madeline Girard, collected more than 30 different peacock spider species from the wilds of Australia and brought them back to her lab at UC Berkeley. Under controlled conditions, she recorded their unique dances in the hopes of deciphering what these displays actual say to a female spider and how standards differ between species.
All lab spider footage ©Madeline Girard

 

How Do Squirrels Find Their Nuts?

This is a fascinating look at how squirrels find their buried caches of food.

Published on Feb 25, 2016

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You’d have to be nuts not to love this video!
↓ More info and sources below ↓

Special thanks to Jason Goldman (@jgold85) for help with this episode!

References:
Jacobs, Lucia F., and Emily R. Liman. “Grey squirrels remember the locations of buried nuts.” Animal Behaviour 41.1 (1991): 103-110.

Delgado, Mikel M., et al. “Fox squirrels match food assessment and cache effort to value and scarcity.” PloS one 9.3 (2014): e92892.