Why don’t poisonous animals poison themselves? – TED Ed by Rebecca D. Tarvin

Thousands of animal species use toxic chemicals to defend themselves from predators. Snakes have blood clotting compounds in their fangs, the bombardier beetle has corrosive liquid in its abdomen and jellyfish have venomous, harpoon-like structures in their tentacles. But how do these animals survive their own poisons? Continue reading

The Physical Properties and Chemical Properties of Matter

Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter. Mr. Causey discusses physical properties and changes as well as chemical properties and changes. Physical changes result in NO NEW substances and chemical changes result in NEW substances (products) because of a chemical reaction. Tearing a piece of paper is a physical change but burning a piece of paper is a chemical change. Continue reading

How we look kilometers below the Antarctic ice sheet

Antarctica is a vast and dynamic place, but radar technologies — from World War II-era film to state-of-the-art miniaturized sensors — are enabling scientists to observe and understand changes beneath the continent’s ice in unprecedented detail. Join radio glaciologist Dustin Schroeder on a flight high above Antarctica and see how ice-penetrating radar is helping us learn about future sea level rise — and what the melting ice will mean for us all.

The threat of invasive species – TED Talks, Jennifer Klos

Massive vines that blanket the southern United States, climbing high as they uproot trees and swallow buildings. A ravenous snake that is capable of devouring an alligator. Rabbit populations that eat themselves into starvation. These aren’t horror movie concepts – they’re real stories. But how could such situations exist in nature? Continue reading