Why don’t poisonous animals poison themselves? – TED Ed by Rebecca D. Tarvin

Thousands of animal species use toxic chemicals to defend themselves from predators. Snakes have blood clotting compounds in their fangs, the bombardier beetle has corrosive liquid in its abdomen and jellyfish have venomous, harpoon-like structures in their tentacles. But how do these animals survive their own poisons? Continue reading

How we look kilometers below the Antarctic ice sheet

Antarctica is a vast and dynamic place, but radar technologies — from World War II-era film to state-of-the-art miniaturized sensors — are enabling scientists to observe and understand changes beneath the continent’s ice in unprecedented detail. Join radio glaciologist Dustin Schroeder on a flight high above Antarctica and see how ice-penetrating radar is helping us learn about future sea level rise — and what the melting ice will mean for us all.

How An Ingredient In Airbags Might Turn Explosive | World Science Festival

An airbag can save your life, but if improperly manufactured, it could mean your death. At least five people have died after airbags made by Japanese company Takata exploded during deployment in crashes, bombarding passengers with sharp metal fragments. Continue reading

Edible Slime | Science Experiments | Steve Spangler Science

Want to gobble some ooey-gooey slime? Get your grub on with this gak recipe that you can eat!

Slime is a staple of Halloween, chemistry, and science, in general. What could be better than stretching a glob of goo between your hands or letting it run between your fingers? Well, if you’re like us, you want to be able to eat it. With this Edible Slime recipe, that’s exactly what you can do. What are you waiting for? Mix up a batch of your own.

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2019 International Year of the Periodic Table Timeline of Elements | University of Waterloo Chemistry

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