New Elements Contest | University of Waterloo

The contest is to have students design an elemental tile for each of the four newly named elements, nihonium (Nh), moscovium (Mc), tennessine (Ts) and oganesson (Og).   Voting for the winning tiles  We are now down to the final four!  During the month of May, we will have an online vote to decide which of the final four will be added to our Periodic Table Project. Encourage your students and all chemistry enthusiasts to check out the creative work done by high school students.

Check out the source link below for details on how to vote.

Source: New Elements Contest | Chemistry

Teacher Demo – Water Quality Demonstration

This demonstration shows some differences between potable (drinkable) water and non-potable (non-drinkable) water.  Variations in temperature, turbidity and pH level also determine the types of microorganisms that can thrive in each water sample.  Continue reading

Teacher Demo/Student Activity: Powder Disaster

Introduction

Flour is an ingredient that is found in most kitchens and used regularly for baking and cooking.  Consequently, it is considered safe, and people do not regard the potential hazards.  In reality, flour and dust explosions are extremely dangerous, and reducing the risk of such an explosion is a major concern to the agriculture and food processing industries.

The purpose of this demonstration/activity is to illustrate the importance of being aware of potentially harmful situations and practices in the workplace. In particular, the dustiness of a material can affect the nature of chemical reaction, affecting a safe working environment.

How does it work?

Flour is combustible. When sitting as a stable pile the fuel (flour) is more connected to other flour particles than oxygen particles. As dust, each dust particle is surrounded by oxygen particles. This supports the combustion of the flour particle. As each particle moves through the flame, the combustion moves with the particles. Flour explosions tend to be connected to the movement of flour through air. The source of ignition is often discovered to be a static discharge.

 

Click here to download complete article….

Freezing by Boiling Demo – Flinn Scientific

The boiling point of a liquid depends on the external air pressure. When water is placed under vacuum, the boiling point decreases and the water boils. Boiling, however, is an endothermic process—as the water boils, the temperature decreases, and the water soon freezes!

In this demo, pressure changes cause a sample of acetone freezes while still boiling.

Click here for the complete instructions, courtesy of Flinn Scientific