Will You Still Eat Raw Fish After Watching This Video?

Have you ever noticed that warning about raw or undercooked seafood at the bottom of restaurant menus? Ever wondered why it’s there? Because fish carry a ton of parasites, and if they aren’t prepared correctly then those parasites can make it into your body. But it turns out, this fishy intersection with the wild world of parasites can teach us a lot about how these moochers help keep ecosystems healthy, and why we should protect them. Continue reading

How do cigarettes affect the body? – TED Ed by Krishna Sudhir

Cigarettes aren’t good for us. That’s hardly news — we’ve known about the dangers of smoking for decades. But how exactly do cigarettes harm us, and can our bodies recover if we stop? Krishna Sudhir details what happens when we smoke — and when we quit. Lesson by Krishna Sudhir, directed by TED-Ed. Continue reading

Bilingual Ontario Multimedia Curriculum Resources for Science & Technology Teachers

Teachers, Our Incredible World (www.incredibleworld.ca)  offers multimedia curriculum resources for the Science & Technology strand suitable for grades 4 to 11. All video series, lesson plans, games, newsletters/factsheets, career profiles, and other resources are designed with teachers, for teachers. They cover topics such as: habitats, ecosystems, biodiversity, species-at-risk, invasive species, and other related life sciences subjects. All videos can be viewed on the site.

Filmed in Ontario, each video series features 2 young people -Incredible World Investigators on assignment to interview scientists and discover firsthand why some species are at risk and what is being done about it. From tracking wolves in the boreal forest in the dead of winter, to converting a suburban lawn into a shared habitat for a multitude of species, including bats, the young investigators have fun, while taking their assignments seriously.

Each series is accompanied by lessons that tie the video story-line to the Ontario’s Science and Technology curriculum. The lessons provide a stimulating mix of science-based class discussions and activities and allow educators to integrate group work, skills-building exercises, research, experiments, art, graphing, data recording, critical thinking, and debating into their classrooms. They culminate with students creating a variety of assessment products including informational posters, graphic organizers, and project assessment reports.

Click here to download the complete information package about this amazing resource.  

 

 

How UV Causes Cancer and Aging

UV at ground level is non-ionizing but it damages DNA and causes photoaging – how? Also, it turns out glass doesn’t block all UV (specifically UVA passes through). This is something I learned filming with the UV camera inside. Continue reading

2 farmers weigh in on the pesticide vs. organic debate: Opinion | CBC News

We asked two farmers on either side of the pesticide/herbicide debate — who happen to live in the same part of Saskatchewan — their thoughts on this issue. Here’s what they had to say.

Source: 2 farmers weigh in on the pesticide vs. organic debate: Opinion | CBC News

Why don’t poisonous animals poison themselves? – TED Ed by Rebecca D. Tarvin

Thousands of animal species use toxic chemicals to defend themselves from predators. Snakes have blood clotting compounds in their fangs, the bombardier beetle has corrosive liquid in its abdomen and jellyfish have venomous, harpoon-like structures in their tentacles. But how do these animals survive their own poisons? Continue reading

How do vaccines work? – TED-Ed

The first ever vaccine was created when Edward Jenner, an English physician and scientist, successfully injected small amounts of a cowpox virus into a young boy to protect him from the related (and deadly) smallpox virus. But how does this seemingly counterintuitive process work? Kelwalin Dhanasarnsombut details the science behind vaccines. Continue reading