Beauty Beyond Skin Deep

Some say that beauty’s only skin-deep. But one veterinary surgeon and his team look beneath the surface…literally. Scott Echols says that we don’t actually know very much about the anatomy of animals because haven’t had a way to properly visualize it. But now, with the help of a new imaging technology called BriteVu, researchers have access to a trove of data on animal anatomy. Continue reading

Your Amazing Molecular Machines – Veritasium

Every day in an adult human roughly 50-70 billion of your cells die. They may be damaged, stressed, or just plain old – this is normal, in fact it’s called programmed cell death.

To make up for that loss, right now, inside your body, billions of cells are dividing, creating new cells.

And cell division, also called mitosis, requires an army of tiny molecular machines.DNA is a good place to start – the double helix molecule that we always talk about.

This is a scientifically accurate depiction of DNA. If you unwind the two strands you can see that each has a sugar phosphate backbone connected to the sequence of nucleic acid base pairs, known by the letters A,T,G, and C.

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How Did Dinosaurs Get So Huge?

Part of why we’re so fascinated with extinct dinosaurs it’s just hard for us to believe that animals that huge actually existed. And yet, they existed! From the Jurassic to the Cretaceous Periods, creatures as tall as a five-story building were shaking the Earth.

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios

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How does your body know you’re full? TED-Ed

Hunger claws at your belly. It tugs at your intestines, which begin to writhe, aching to be fed. Being hungry generates a powerful and often unpleasant physical sensation that’s almost impossible to ignore. After you’ve reacted by gorging on your morning pancakes, you start to experience an opposing force: fullness. But how does your body actually know when you’re full? Hilary Coller explains. Lesson by Hilary Coller, directed by Sashko Danylenko.

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Survival of the Sneakiest

“Survival of the fittest” means that the strong succeed; or does it? The struggle for survival isn’t the only struggle that living things have to win. This comic from Evolution Berkeley takes students through the adaptations that crickets have evolved due to sexual selection. When teaching evolution, it is important to show students that natural and sexual selection are two sides of the same coin.

Click here for the rest of the comic.