20 Million Animals Preserved In Alcohol – Earth Unplugged

The Spirit Collection in London’s Natural History Museum is home to over 20 million dead animal specimens, collected from around the world. They are preserved and kept for research and educational purposes. Lizzie Daly met up with Ollie Crimmen, Senior Curator of Fish to find out a little more. Continue reading

Characteristics of Soil Activity

 

In this activity, students will observe a variety of soil types and describe the characteristics of these soils.  Soil is made up of air, water, recycling organisms, rock particles, and humus.  Different types of soils are defined by the different proportions of humus and rock particles they contain.  Humus is formed from the decomposition produced by recycling organisms.  The three types of rock particles are sand, silt, and clay.

Continue reading

Tagging the Largest Shark on Earth – Our Blue Planet

The size of a school bus but in many ways a mystery, whale sharks continue to fascinate. Join a team of international scientists at a renowned marine sanctuary in Cabo Pulmo, Mexico and discover how we’re trying to better understand these remarkable creatures. Continue reading

Wrapper Worm – Sick Science! #175

You can have a ton of science fun with a straw. You can make it into a blow gun, using the properties of air, or it can double as a pipette when your lab has run out. But did you know you can perform some awesome hands-on science with the straw’s wrapper, too? It’s true. With the Wrapper Worm, we’ll reveal how to turn an ordinary straw wrapper into a growing worm!

SICK SCIENCE APPAREL NOW AVAILABLE! Click here: http://spanglersci.com/SickScienceApp…

Find out why this works here: http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/l…

Want more experiments like this? Check out http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/p…

The Dripper

Hand print

Many children can identify that water exists in 3 states within our natural environment. Understanding that it is the very same water that undergoes changes of state presents far more of a challenge to children in grade 2. The following experiment is simple yet effective in helping children understand changes in state and a rudimentary understanding of the water cycle.

Continue reading