Happy Science Literacy Week from STAO – submitted by Amy Gorecki

We here at STAO hope that you are off to a great start to the new school year. September 16-22 is National Science Literacy Week and we hope that you will join us in celebrating science and oceans research in Canada.

Stay tuned to STAO’s social media channels, watch for the next edition of STAONews, and get involved in some of our upcoming STAO events in celebration of National Science Literacy Week!

Amy Gorecki

Executive Director, STAO/APSO

Amy.Gorecki@STAO.ca

Click here for more info about exciting upcoming STAO events – Don’t Miss Them!  

 

 

7 Scientific Urban Legends Debunked!

It sounds like such an incredible fact. “Our own cells are outnumbered by our microbes 10 to 1!” I don’t remember where I first heard it. But I read it in science papers and articles by journalists, so I believed it without question. I even made one of my first videos based on this fact. Continue reading

Making Liquid Nitrogen From Scratch! – Veritasium

Making liquid nitrogen is hard – in fact up until 150 years ago scientists doubted whether it was even possible to liquefy nitrogen. In 1823, At the royal institution in London, Michael Faraday first produced liquid chlorine, kind of accidentally by putting it under high pressure. He similarly liquefied ammonia. Continue reading

Why Don’t Birds Lay Square Eggs?

What is ”egg-shaped” even? I used to think it was the shape of a chicken egg. Then one day I saw a collection of eggs from lots of different bird species, and I realized just how many different kind of egg shapes there really are! I had to know why. And it turns out a couple teams of scientists had wondered the same thing. Here’s what science says about why eggs are egg-shaped, if that’s even a thing, which I’ve learned it might not be. Evolution of bird eggs, go!

How Much Fun Can We Make With Electricity? – by Otto Weavers

This is a  2 week low safety risk, high engagement, creative, design, build, inquiry-based  and presentation activity that involves  students  in developing a thorough understanding of current electricity and how to apply that to electrical circuits in a meaningful and fun way.

Click here for more information

Thanks for the ideas Otto!