Slowmation – A Narrated Stop Motion Teaching Tool

A “Slowmation” (abbreviated from “Slow Animation”) is a simplified way for teachers or students to design and make a narrated stop-motion animation that is played slowly at 2 frames/second to explain a concept or tell a story. The explanation can be enhanced with text or music and is an engaging way to learn because students conduct research and use their own technology to design a sequence of representations culminating in the slowmation, which is a multimodal digital representation. Continue reading

How to Select and Use a Micropipet – submitted by Flinn Scientific Canada

Introduction

Measuring tiny volumes with precision and accuracy requires a micropipet. In the biology lab, micropipets are used for preparing and loading DNA samples, microscale experiments and the preparation of many types of samples. These applications rely on good technique to reduce error. This guide explains how to choose the proper micropipet for the application and techniques to help ensure that measurements are accurate and precise.

Continue reading

Growing Plants in Test Tubes | Science Experiments | Steve Spangler Science

Reveal the science behind sprouting seeds and water conservation.

Nothing compares to eating fresh vegetables picked right out of the garden! But, what’s happening out of sight in the soil of that garden? Here are two plant-growing activities you can do anytime of the year to discover the science behind those growing marvels and to discover a unique way to conserve water, too.

Continue to the Source for complete details….

Source: Growing Plants in Test Tubes | Science Experiments | Steve Spangler Science

Open-book, collaborative quiz: Recipe for engagement – by Michael Jansen

I’ve written about incentivizing students as a way towards engagement. I recently hit upon a great idea — a real brain wave. AP Chemistry students completed a challenging lab where they carried out (and analyzed) a bunch of redox reactions. Afterwards, we had a discussion, which included repeating several of the reactions as teacher demonstrations, with explanations along the way.

Click here for the entire article originally published in Chem13 News.  

Many thanks to Chem13 News for permission to provide this link to our readers.

Build the Simplest Electric Motor – submitted by Flinn Scientific Canada

Introduction

Hans Christian Oersted (1777–1851), a Danish physicist, was performing an experiment in 1820 when he noticed that whenever an electric current from a battery was switched on or off, a nearby compass needle was deflected. Through additional experiments, Oersted was able to demonstrate the link between electricity and magnetism. The following year, English scientist Michael Faraday (1791–1867) created a device that produced “electromagnetic rotation.” This device is known as a homopolar motor since the motor requires no commutator to reverse the current.

A motor converts electrical energy to mechanical energy. The simple motor in this activity changes the electrical energy output by the battery to mechanical energy as the copper wire is set into rotational motion. Any current-carrying wire produces an associated magnetic field. The electrons in the wire are subjected to a magnetic field and experience a force—referred to as the Lorentz force—that is perpendicular to both the magnetic field and the direction of movement. At some point along the length of the wire, the electrical current is not parallel to the magnetic field. The resulting Lorentz force is tangential and induces a torque on the copper wire. This torque causes the copper wire to spin.
Continue reading

Reviewing Making Molecules Activity Using “Remind”

Molecule model on periodic table of the elements

Remind allows teachers to send messages to students and parents regarding upcoming assignments, meetings, events, and activities.  This application also permits teachers to check which students have read their messages.  Messages can be sent to individuals, to a group, or to a class.   Remind is safe since phone numbers, which can be used to invite members, are kept confidential and members will have to download the Remind application to receive ongoing messages or they can communicate using e-mail.  Continue reading